Tag Archive: audit

  1. Are ads an inevitability for Netflix?

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    Netflix – a success story

    It’s fair to say that Netflix is one of the huge tech success stories of the 21stcentury. Having started as a DVD sales and rental business, it expanded its business in 2010 with the introduction of streaming media, whilst initially retaining the DVD side of the business. It now has more than 148 million subscribers in over 190 countries. Its earnings to date have reflected its meteoric rise: in Q1 of 2019, for example, the company reported $4.52bn revenue, compared to the $4.5bn anticipated by Wall Street.

    Competitors on the horizon

    So far, so good. However, Netflix has undoubtedly benefited from first-mover advantage, and that may be coming to an end. Many media companies such as Disney, Apple, Amazon, Sky and traditional broadcasters are launching their own streaming services with established and new content; Disney has already removed all its original movies from Netflix, as well as those it owns the rights to, including Marvel and Star Wars. In the aforementioned Q1 report, Netflix stated that it didn’t expect this new competition to negatively affect its subscriber growth; however, that seems inevitable, and Netflix has already taken steps to mitigate the risk.

    Taking the battle to competitors with original content

    The obvious solution to increased competition has been for Netflix to make substantial financial investment into the creation of its own original content, which can’t be withdrawn by a competitor. However, that’s a huge investment and, as CNN points out, ‘the continuous influx of revenue still falls several steps short of what the company is spending each quarter [on original content]’. The cost has to be covered somehow – but how?

    Running ads to cover costs

    In an IAB panel back in April, execs from YouTube, JPMorgan and two agencies concluded that running ads were an inevitability for Netflix – echoing Sir Martin Sorrell in 2015 when he said that Netflix would inevitably have to build digital ads into its marketing strategy. Hulu has done this successfully with a two-tier subscription option – a more expensive ad-free choice, and a cheaper ad-supported service. Analysts believe that Hulu makes more money per subscriber from its subscription plus ads combination than it does from its more expensive ad-free option. Given Netflix’s scale – it is the third most-watched TV ‘channel’ in the UK, for example – it is an extremely attractive proposition for advertisers – and that makes it attractive for investors and Wall Street. However, Netflix subscribers are vocal in their opposition to this suggestion, and a 2018 trial was not a success: 57% of a control group said they would cancel their subscription. It’s worth noting though that Hulu added more subscribers than Netflix in Q1 the US (3.8m versus 1.74m), even with ads.

    There are alternatives to ads

    What are the alternatives? Netflix could of course increase its subscription prices; even after bumping them up in the last quarter of 2017, it increased its subscriber count by 50% more than Wall Street predictions. There is probably an upper limit to this option though. Another would be to look at the other side of the balance sheet: cut investment in original content and focus on the shows that are sure to be smash hits, which aren’t necessarily original. In 2018, just two of the top ten most watched Netflix shows were Netflix originals.

    What does the future hold for Netflix?

    Netflix is comfortably winning the streaming game at the moment, but it needs to re-examine its model in light of the rise of competitors. A digital ad platform is one option, but there is a risk that that move would lead to the loss of many of its subscribers – which competitors would welcome with open arms. There are other options – increasing subscription prices and cutting costs elsewhere – and Netflix will have to look at all of them in depth in the coming months.

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  2. Conflict of interest means WPP won’t participate in Accenture-led pitches

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    Conflict of Interest means WPP won’t participate in Accenture-led pitches

    In a move unsurprising to many industry insiders, it emerged this week that WPP would henceforth refuse to participate in any Accenture-led audits or reviews. It cited as its reason that Accenture could use the data to which it has privileged access as an auditor to undercut WPP’s prices in other pitches for ad budgets.

    Accenture’s digital arm gives it an unfair advantage

    The concern is rooted in the fact that, last year, Accenture’s digital arm, Accenture Interactive, launched a programmatic services practice, offering programmatic consulting and in-housing; media strategy, planning and activation; and ad tech implementation and support. This placed them in direct competition with specialist programmatic companies but also the major media agencies, including WPP’s GroupM.

    WPP is arguing that, from Accenture’s privileged position, it will be able to offer advertisers cheaper, more effective media rates during pitches, giving it a massive and unfair advantage. Accenture maintains that there are internal barriers in place between its audit and programmatic buying business units, but WPP is evidently unconvinced – as are we.

    The threat from the ‘vanguard of advertising’

    This decision is not out of the blue: there has been growing disquiet amongst the more traditional media agencies who feel, according to an article in the New York Times, “threatened by the ‘vanguard of advertising today’ – consulting firms like Accenture which offer technical wizardry in an age of cord-cutting and ad-blocking.” The fact that Accenture will now potentially be able to take market share from these agencies in an ‘underhand’ way only serves to entrench the tension – the battle has become war.

    WPP needs to persuade clients to follow its lead

    The issue with WPP’s move is that it will need to persuade clients – both current and future – to not work with Accenture as well. That could be extremely difficult: when clients own their data (as opposed to their agency), it is often inextricably entwined with a number of parties, an arrangement that is difficult to move away from; a Digiday article points out that clients will judge whether it’s worth it based on how satisfied they are with their auditor, and not on any gripes the advertiser has with said auditor.

    ECI Media Management: independent and impartial

    At ECI Media Management we fully back WPP’s decision. Impartiality is at the heart of effective auditing and no company which offers media services to a market where it has highly privileged access to the data and financial information of both advertisers and agencies can claim to be impartial. As Paul Bansfair, the Director General of the IPA (the UK ad industry’s trade body) said when Accenture Interactive announced the launch of its programmatic buying branch, “In an era where transparency is under the spotlight, this self-evident conflict of interest is unacceptable.”

    At ECI Media Management, we are 100% director-owned and have no affiliations with any media agencies or owners, so our advice and actions are always based on what is best for the client. We believe that should be the norm across the auditing and media management sector.

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